Slavery in History and Memory

"Emancipation Monument, Barbados," Reference NW-0231, as shown on www.slaveryimages.org, sponsored by the Virginia Foundation for the Humanities and the University of Virginia Library.
"Emancipation Monument, Barbados," Reference NW-0231, as shown on www.slaveryimages.org, sponsored by the Virginia Foundation for the Humanities and the University of Virginia Library.

Current discussion in Africa, Europe, and the Americas over reparations, affirmative action, and whether governments and private corporations should apologize for owning or trading human beings attests to the fact that the past has not passed, that legacies of slavery and slave trading continue to shape the Atlantic world in powerful and complicated ways.

In exploring the history and memory of the African, European, and American past, this site provides an international forum in which students and scholars can explore—together—how individuals experienced bondage and slave trades, as well as how historians, artists, anthropologists, novelists, archaeologists, poets, politicians, and other individuals today remember, represent, and research systems of slavery and slave trading. HistoryConnect seeks to link students and scholars around the world who are interested in slavery, slave trading, and their legacies.

You are invited to help construct this site by posting relevant articles, images, projects, or personal reflections and ideas to existing pages. You may also create your own pages to stimulate constructive dialogue in new areas. The discussion thread on each page allows us to engage one another in civil and thoughtful conversation—please feel free to comment on any posted item or to offer other items you have encountered in your reading and research.

Initial contributors to this site include students and scholars based at The University of Louisiana at Lafayette, several Virginia institutions of higher learning (the College of William and Mary, Virginia Union University, Randolph-Macon College, and J. Sargeant Reynolds Community College),as well as students and scholars from universities in Ghana, Sénégal, Nigeria, Brazil, Canada, and the UK.

If you have any questions about this site or its contents, please contact Ted Maris-Wolf at tedmw@louisiana.edu